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Crimpers OC-070F125O-CRIMP TOOLING KIT
Manufacturer: TE Connectivity


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7-2266050-7
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TE Connectivity
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Crimpers
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TE Connectivity
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Crimpers
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Tools
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Crimpers OC-055F072O-752- CRIMP TOOLING KIT
1
Ocean Side Feed Applicator
4
Crimpers OC--CRIMPTOOLINGKIT
2
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Crimpers OC-055F072O-752- CRIMP TOOLING KIT
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Crimpers CRIMPER, WIRE (.103" F)
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Crimpers CRIMPER, INSULATION OVERLAP PREM
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Crimpers CRIMPER, INSULATION O
11
Crimpers ANVIL COMBINATION
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Crimpers HOLDER, FORMING PIN ASSY APPLICATOR TOOL
1

Crimp Tooling ? Where Form Meets Function Quality, cost, and throughput are key attributes for any production process. The crimp termination process is no exception. Many variables contribute to the results. Crimp tooling, defined here as crimpers and anvils, is one of those variables. This paper will focus on defining key characteristics of crimp tooling and the effects those characteristics may have on the production process. Introduction Quality, cost, and throughput are associated with specific measurements and linked to process variables. Crimp height, pull test values, leads per hour, and crimp symmetry are some of the measures used to monitor production termination processes. Many variables affect the process such as wire and terminal quality, machine repeatability, setup parameters, and operator skill. Crimp tooling is a significant contributor to the overall crimp termination process. The condition of crimp tooling is constantly monitored in production by various means. These means are often indirect measures. Crimp Quality Monitors and crimp cross sections are methodologies that infer the condition of the crimp tooling. Visual inspec- tion of the crimp tooling can be used to check for gross failures such as tool breakage or tooling deformation which occurred as a result of a machine crash. Continuous monitoring of production will help determine when the process needs to be adjusted and the replacement of crimp tooling can be one of the adjustments that is made. Crimp tooling can a have positive effect on the quality, cost, and throughput of the termination process. High qual- ity crimp tooling can produce high quality crimps with less in-process variation over a greater number of termina- tions. It is difficult to distinguish critical tooling attributes with visual inspection only. Some attributes cannot be in- spected even by running crimp samples. This paper will present the reader with information that identifies key crimp tooling attributes and the effect of those attributes on the crimping process. Key Crimp Tooling Characteristics There are four major categories of key characteristics for crimp tooling. These are: ? Geometry and associated tolerances ? Materials ? Surface condition ? Surface treatment Each of these categories contributes to the overall performance of the production termination process. tooling.te.comCrimp Tooling ? Where Form Meets Function Quality, cost, and throughput are key attributes for any production process. The crimp termination process is no exception. Many variables contribute to the results. Crimp tooling, defined here as crimpers and anvils, is one of those variables. This paper will focus on defining key characteristics of crimp tooling and the effects those characteristics may have on the production process. Introduction Quality, cost, and throughput are associated with specific measurements and linked to process variables. Crimp height, pull test values, leads per hour, and crimp symmetry are some of the measures used to monitor production termination processes. Many variables affect the process such as wire and terminal quality, machine repeatability, setup parameters, and operator skill. Crimp tooling is a significant contributor to the overall crimp termination process. The condition of crimp tooling is constantly monitored in production by various means. These means are often indirect measures. Crimp Quality Monitors and crimp cross sections are methodologies that infer the condition of the crimp tooling. Visual inspec- tion of the crimp tooling can be used to check for gross failures such as tool breakage or tooling deformation which occurred as a result of a machine crash. Continuous monitoring of production will help determine when the process needs to be adjusted and the replacement of crimp tooling can be one of the adjustments that is made. Crimp tooling can a have positive effect on the quality, cost, and throughput of the termination process. High qual- ity crimp tooling can produce high quality crimps with less in-process variation over a greater number of termina- tions. It is difficult to distinguish critical tooling attributes with visual inspection only. Some attributes cannot be in- spected even by running crimp samples. This paper will present the reader with information that identifies key crimp tooling attributes and the effect of those attributes on the crimping process. Key Crimp Tooling Characteristics There are four major categories of key characteristics for crimp tooling. These are: ? Geometry and associated tolerances ? Materials ? Surface condition ? Surface treatment Each of these categories contributes to the overall performance of the production termination process. tooling.te.comGeometry and Associated Tolerances Terminals are designed to perform to specification only when the final crimp form is within a narrow range of dimensions. Controlling critical crimp dimensions is influenced by many factors including: ? Wire size and material variation ? Terminal size and material variation ? Equipment condition The final quality and consistency of a crimp can never be any better than the quality and consistency of the tooling that is used. If other variations could be eliminated, tooling can and should be able to produce crimp forms that are well within specified tolerances. In addition, variation from one tooling set to another should be held to a minimum. Crimp tooling features that are well controlled and exhibit excellent consistency from tooling set to tooling set can result in shorter setup time as well as more consistent production re- sults. Some critical crimp characteristics are directly defined by the tooling form and are obvious. These include: Cross Section Defining Crimp Width, Crimp Height, and Flash ? Crimp width ? Crimp length Other critical crimp characteristics can be related to several tooling form fea- tures and/or other system factors. These may be less obvious and include: ? Flash ? Roll, twist, and side-to-side bend ? Up/down bend ? Crimp symmetry ? Bellmouth The following discussion focuses on two characteristics, crimp width and flash, as examples of how tooling can affect crimp form. Similar arguments can be applied to the others. Crimp Width Crimp width is a good example of a feature that should be consistent and in control between different crimpers of the same part number. The reason for this is quite straightforward. For a given terminal and wire combination, it is necessary to achieve an area index, AI, which is determined by the terminal designer for op- timal mechanical and electrical performance. Crimp height, CH, and crimp width, CW, directly affect achieving proper AI. Area index, AI(as a percentage), is defined as: where At is the total area of the wire and barrel after crimping. A and A are, respectively, the initial cross- W B sectional areas of the wire and barrel before crimping.Crimp Tooling ? Where Form Meets Function Quality, cost, and throughput are key attributes for any production process. The crimp termination process is no exception. Many variables contribute to the results. Crimp tooling, defined here as crimpers and anvils, is one of those variables. This paper will focus on defining key characteristics of crimp tooling and the effects those characteristics may have on the production process. Introduction Quality, cost, and throughput are associated with specific measurements and linked to process variables. Crimp height, pull test values, leads per hour, and crimp symmetry are some of the measures used to monitor production termination processes. Many variables affect the process such as wire and terminal quality, machine repeatability, setup parameters, and operator skill. Crimp tooling is a significant contributor to the overall crimp termination process. The condition of crimp tooling is constantly monitored in production by various means. These means are often indirect measures. Crimp Quality Monitors and crimp cross sections are methodologies that infer the condition of the crimp tooling. Visual inspec- tion of the crimp tooling can be used to check for gross failures such as tool breakage or tooling deformation which occurred as a result of a machine crash. Continuous monitoring of production will help determine when the process needs to be adjusted and the replacement of crimp tooling can be one of the adjustments that is made. Crimp tooling can a have positive effect on the quality, cost, and throughput of the termination process. High qual- ity crimp tooling can produce high quality crimps with less in-process variation over a greater number of termina- tions. It is difficult to distinguish critical tooling attributes with visual inspection only. Some attributes cannot be in- spected even by running crimp samples. This paper will present the reader with information that identifies key crimp tooling attributes and the effect of those attributes on the crimping process. Key Crimp Tooling Characteristics There are four major categories of key characteristics for crimp tooling. These are: ? Geometry and associated tolerances ? Materials ? Surface condition ? Surface treatment Each of these categories contributes to the overall performance of the production termination process. tooling.te.comCrimp Tooling ? Where Form Meets Function Quality, cost, and throughput are key attributes for any production process. The crimp termination process is no exception. Many variables contribute to the results. Crimp tooling, defined here as crimpers and anvils, is one of those variables. This paper will focus on defining key characteristics of crimp tooling and the effects those characteristics may have on the production process. Introduction Quality, cost, and throughput are associated with specific measurements and linked to process variables. Crimp height, pull test values, leads per hour, and crimp symmetry are some of the measures used to monitor production termination processes. Many variables affect the process such as wire and terminal quality, machine repeatability, setup parameters, and operator skill. Crimp tooling is a significant contributor to the overall crimp termination process. The condition of crimp tooling is constantly monitored in production by various means. These means are often indirect measures. Crimp Quality Monitors and crimp cross sections are methodologies that infer the condition of the crimp tooling. Visual inspec- tion of the crimp tooling can be used to check for gross failures such as tool breakage or tooling deformation which occurred as a result of a machine crash. Continuous monitoring of production will help determine when the process needs to be adjusted and the replacement of crimp tooling can be one of the adjustments that is made. Crimp tooling can a have positive effect on the quality, cost, and throughput of the termination process. High qual- ity crimp tooling can produce high quality crimps with less in-process variation over a greater number of termina- tions. It is difficult to distinguish critical tooling attributes with visual inspection only. Some attributes cannot be in- spected even by running crimp samples. This paper will present the reader with information that identifies key crimp tooling attributes and the effect of those attributes on the crimping process. Key Crimp Tooling Characteristics There are four major categories of key characteristics for crimp tooling. These are: ? Geometry and associated tolerances ? Materials ? Surface condition ? Surface treatment Each of these categories contributes to the overall performance of the production termination process. tooling.te.comGeometry and Associated Tolerances Terminals are designed to perform to specification only when the final crimp form is within a narrow range of dimensions. Controlling critical crimp dimensions is influenced by many factors including: ? Wire size and material variation ? Terminal size and material variation ? Equipment condition The final quality and consistency of a crimp can never be any better than the quality and consistency of the tooling that is used. If other variations could be eliminated, tooling can and should be able to produce crimp forms that are well within specified tolerances. In addition, variation from one tooling set to another should be held to a minimum. Crimp tooling features that are well controlled and exhibit excellent consistency from tooling set to tooling set can result in shorter setup time as well as more consistent production re- sults. Some critical crimp characteristics are directly defined by the tooling form and are obvious. These include: Cross Section Defining Crimp Width, Crimp Height, and Flash ? Crimp width ? Crimp length Other critical crimp characteristics can be related to several tooling form fea- tures and/or other system factors. These may be less obvious and include: ? Flash ? Roll, twist, and side-to-side bend ? Up/down bend ? Crimp symmetry ? Bellmouth The following discussion focuses on two characteristics, crimp width and flash, as examples of how tooling can affect crimp form. Similar arguments can be applied to the others. Crimp Width Crimp width is a good example of a feature that should be consistent and in control between different crimpers of the same part number. The reason for this is quite straightforward. For a given terminal and wire combination, it is necessary to achieve an area index, AI, which is determined by the terminal designer for op- timal mechanical and electrical performance. Crimp height, CH, and crimp width, CW, directly affect achieving proper AI. Area index, AI(as a percentage), is defined as: where At is the total area of the wire and barrel after crimping. A and A are, respectively, the initial cross- W B sectional areas of the wire and barrel before crimping.A typical design point for AI is 80%. In order to maintain Cross Sections Showing Min- (a) the same AI, the crimp height, CH, needs to change in- imum (a) and Maximum (b) Area Index perTerminal versely to the change of crimp width, CW, in approxi- Specification?aVariation of mately the same proportion. Thus, if the CW increases ? 3.5% +2%, the CH needs to change approximately -2% in order to achieve the same AI design point. At first glance that may not seem significant, but in reality it can be very significant. Using another general industry design rule of (b) the ratio of CH to CW of approximately 65%, a typical set of dimensions used as an example may be: CW = 0.110 in, CH = 0.068 in Therefore, varying the CW by 2% would result in a CH variation of 2%, or 0.0014 in. At a CH tolerance of ? 0.002 in, 35% of the total CH tolerance would be used by a 2% variation in CW. Thus, the importance of crimp width control is obvious when tooling is changed during a production run. Flash Most crimp terminations have a requirement to limit flash. Flash is defined as the material which protrudes to the sides of the terminal down and along the anvil. Flash is normal in the crimping process but excessive flash is very undesirable. Controlling flash requires a balance of several geometric factors. Other factors influencing flash are related to surface finish and friction, which will be discussed later in this paper. A dominant factor in controlling flash is controlling the clearance between the crimper and anvil during the crimp process. Defining the ideal clearance could in itself be a simple matter were it not for two facts: ? In order to minimize terminals? sticking in the crimper, the sides of the crimper are tapered. Thus the clearance between the anvil and crimper varies throughout the stroke. ? Crimper and anvil sets are typically designed to terminate two to four wire sizes. This creates multiple crimp heights. Since the sides of the crimper are tapered to minimize terminal sticking, the maximum clearance permitted without creating flash must be assigned to the maximum crimp height specified for the tooling set. In addition, a minimal clearance must be maintained for the smallest crimp height specified by the tooling set to Crimper-to-Anvil Clearance = X +Y prohibit contact between the anvil and crimper. at the Final Crimp Height Crimper to anvil clearance is thus a combination of crimp width, crimper leg taper, anvil width, and crimp height. The critical design point is at the largest crimp height. This contribution to the gap is directly dependent on dimensional control. The following is offered as an example: Nominal condition: CH = 0.073 in, CW = 0.110 in Crimper leg taper = 3.0 degree Anvil Width = 0.109 in Nominal anvil to crimper total clearance = 0.005 in The clearance can grow rapidly with small changes to (a) Significant flash can be generated the nominal dimensions: with excessive anvil to crimper clearance, as shown by nominal CH remains unchanged = 0.073 in design condition (a) and +0.003 in Increase in crimp width, CW, = 0.0008 in over nominal condition (b) Increase in crimper leg taper = 0.8 degree Decrease in anvil width = 0.0008 in The total increase in total clearance is this case = (b) 0.0026 in This more than a 50% increase in the nominal design clearance, which can result in unacceptable flash (see right). Dimensional control is clearly critical.Crimp Tooling ? Where Form Meets Function Quality, cost, and throughput are key attributes for any production process. The crimp termination process is no exception. Many variables contribute to the results. Crimp tooling, defined here as crimpers and anvils, is one of those variables. This paper will focus on defining key characteristics of crimp tooling and the effects those characteristics may have on the production process. Introduction Quality, cost, and throughput are associated with specific measurements and linked to process variables. Crimp height, pull test values, leads per hour, and crimp symmetry are some of the measures used to monitor production termination processes. Many variables affect the process such as wire and terminal quality, machine repeatability, setup parameters, and operator skill. Crimp tooling is a significant contributor to the overall crimp termination process. The condition of crimp tooling is constantly monitored in production by various means. These means are often indirect measures. Crimp Quality Monitors and crimp cross sections are methodologies that infer the condition of the crimp tooling. Visual inspec- tion of the crimp tooling can be used to check for gross failures such as tool breakage or tooling deformation which occurred as a result of a machine crash. Continuous monitoring of production will help determine when the process needs to be adjusted and the replacement of crimp tooling can be one of the adjustments that is made. Crimp tooling can a have positive effect on the quality, cost, and throughput of the termination process. High qual- ity crimp tooling can produce high quality crimps with less in-process variation over a greater number of termina- tions. It is difficult to distinguish critical tooling attributes with visual inspection only. Some attributes cannot be in- spected even by running crimp samples. This paper will present the reader with information that identifies key crimp tooling attributes and the effect of those attributes on the crimping process. Key Crimp Tooling Characteristics There are four major categories of key characteristics for crimp tooling. These are: ? Geometry and associated tolerances ? Materials ? Surface condition ? Surface treatment Each of these categories contributes to the overall performance of the production termination process. tooling.te.comCrimp Tooling ? Where Form Meets Function Quality, cost, and throughput are key attributes for any production process. The crimp termination process is no exception. Many variables contribute to the results. Crimp tooling, defined here as crimpers and anvils, is one of those variables. This paper will focus on defining key characteristics of crimp tooling and the effects those characteristics may have on the production process. Introduction Quality, cost, and throughput are associated with specific measurements and linked to process variables. Crimp height, pull test values, leads per hour, and crimp symmetry are some of the measures used to monitor production termination processes. Many variables affect the process such as wire and terminal quality, machine repeatability, setup parameters, and operator skill. Crimp tooling is a significant contributor to the overall crimp termination process. The condition of crimp tooling is constantly monitored in production by various means. These means are often indirect measures. Crimp Quality Monitors and crimp cross sections are methodologies that infer the condition of the crimp tooling. Visual inspec- tion of the crimp tooling can be used to check for gross failures such as tool breakage or tooling deformation which occurred as a result of a machine crash. Continuous monitoring of production will help determine when the process needs to be adjusted and the replacement of crimp tooling can be one of the adjustments that is made. Crimp tooling can a have positive effect on the quality, cost, and throughput of the termination process. High qual- ity crimp tooling can produce high quality crimps with less in-process variation over a greater number of termina- tions. It is difficult to distinguish critical tooling attributes with visual inspection only. Some attributes cannot be in- spected even by running crimp samples. This paper will present the reader with information that identifies key crimp tooling attributes and the effect of those attributes on the crimping process. Key Crimp Tooling Characteristics There are four major categories of key characteristics for crimp tooling. These are: ? Geometry and associated tolerances ? Materials ? Surface condition ? Surface treatment Each of these categories contributes to the overall performance of the production termination process. tooling.te.comGeometry and Associated Tolerances Terminals are designed to perform to specification only when the final crimp form is within a narrow range of dimensions. Controlling critical crimp dimensions is influenced by many factors including: ? Wire size and material variation ? Terminal size and material variation ? Equipment condition The final quality and consistency of a crimp can never be any better than the quality and consistency of the tooling that is used. If other variations could be eliminated, tooling can and should be able to produce crimp forms that are well within specified tolerances. In addition, variation from one tooling set to another should be held to a minimum. Crimp tooling features that are well controlled and exhibit excellent consistency from tooling set to tooling set can result in shorter setup time as well as more consistent production re- sults. Some critical crimp characteristics are directly defined by the tooling form and are obvious. These include: Cross Section Defining Crimp Width, Crimp Height, and Flash ? Crimp width ? Crimp length Other critical crimp characteristics can be related to several tooling form fea- tures and/or other system factors. These may be less obvious and include: ? Flash ? Roll, twist, and side-to-side bend ? Up/down bend ? Crimp symmetry ? Bellmouth The following discussion focuses on two characteristics, crimp width and flash, as examples of how tooling can affect crimp form. Similar arguments can be applied to the others. Crimp Width Crimp width is a good example of a feature that should be consistent and in control between different crimpers of the same part number. The reason for this is quite straightforward. For a given terminal and wire combination, it is necessary to achieve an area index, AI, which is determined by the terminal designer for op- timal mechanical and electrical performance. Crimp height, CH, and crimp width, CW, directly affect achieving proper AI. Area index, AI(as a percentage), is defined as: where At is the total area of the wire and barrel after crimping. A and A are, respectively, the initial cross- W B sectional areas of the wire and barrel before crimping.Crimp Tooling ? Where Form Meets Function Quality, cost, and throughput are key attributes for any production process. The crimp termination process is no exception. Many variables contribute to the results. Crimp tooling, defined here as crimpers and anvils, is one of those variables. This paper will focus on defining key characteristics of crimp tooling and the effects those characteristics may have on the production process. Introduction Quality, cost, and throughput are associated with specific measurements and linked to process variables. Crimp height, pull test values, leads per hour, and crimp symmetry are some of the measures used to monitor production termination processes. Many variables affect the process such as wire and terminal quality, machine repeatability, setup parameters, and operator skill. Crimp tooling is a significant contributor to the overall crimp termination process. The condition of crimp tooling is constantly monitored in production by various means. These means are often indirect measures. Crimp Quality Monitors and crimp cross sections are methodologies that infer the condition of the crimp tooling. Visual inspec- tion of the crimp tooling can be used to check for gross failures such as tool breakage or tooling deformation which occurred as a result of a machine crash. Continuous monitoring of production will help determine when the process needs to be adjusted and the replacement of crimp tooling can be one of the adjustments that is made. Crimp tooling can a have positive effect on the quality, cost, and throughput of the termination process. High qual- ity crimp tooling can produce high quality crimps with less in-process variation over a greater number of termina- tions. It is difficult to distinguish critical tooling attributes with visual inspection only. Some attributes cannot be in- spected even by running crimp samples. This paper will present the reader with information that identifies key crimp tooling attributes and the effect of those attributes on the crimping process. Key Crimp Tooling Characteristics There are four major categories of key characteristics for crimp tooling. These are: ? Geometry and associated tolerances ? Materials ? Surface condition ? Surface treatment Each of these categories contributes to the overall performance of the production termination process. tooling.te.comCrimp Tooling ? Where Form Meets Function Quality, cost, and throughput are key attributes for any production process. The crimp termination process is no exception. Many variables contribute to the results. Crimp tooling, defined here as crimpers and anvils, is one of those variables. This paper will focus on defining key characteristics of crimp tooling and the effects those characteristics may have on the production process. Introduction Quality, cost, and throughput are associated with specific measurements and linked to process variables. Crimp height, pull test values, leads per hour, and crimp symmetry are some of the measures used to monitor production termination processes. Many variables affect the process such as wire and terminal quality, machine repeatability, setup parameters, and operator skill. Crimp tooling is a significant contributor to the overall crimp termination process. The condition of crimp tooling is constantly monitored in production by various means. These means are often indirect measures. Crimp Quality Monitors and crimp cross sections are methodologies that infer the condition of the crimp tooling. Visual inspec- tion of the crimp tooling can be used to check for gross failures such as tool breakage or tooling deformation which occurred as a result of a machine crash. Continuous monitoring of production will help determine when the process needs to be adjusted and the replacement of crimp tooling can be one of the adjustments that is made. Crimp tooling can a have positive effect on the quality, cost, and throughput of the termination process. High qual- ity crimp tooling can produce high quality crimps with less in-process variation over a greater number of termina- tions. It is difficult to distinguish critical tooling attributes with visual inspection only. Some attributes cannot be in- spected even by running crimp samples. This paper will present the reader with information that identifies key crimp tooling attributes and the effect of those attributes on the crimping process. Key Crimp Tooling Characteristics There are four major categories of key characteristics for crimp tooling. These are: ? Geometry and associated tolerances ? Materials ? Surface condition ? Surface treatment Each of these categories contributes to the overall performance of the production termination process. tooling.te.comGeometry and Associated Tolerances Terminals are designed to perform to specification only when the final crimp form is within a narrow range of dimensions. Controlling critical crimp dimensions is influenced by many factors including: ? Wire size and material variation ? Terminal size and material variation ? Equipment condition The final quality and consistency of a crimp can never be any better than the quality and consistency of the tooling that is used. If other variations could be eliminated, tooling can and should be able to produce crimp forms that are well within specified tolerances. In addition, variation from one tooling set to another should be held to a minimum. Crimp tooling features that are well controlled and exhibit excellent consistency from tooling set to tooling set can result in shorter setup time as well as more consistent production re- sults. Some critical crimp characteristics are directly defined by the tooling form and are obvious. These include: Cross Section Defining Crimp Width, Crimp Height, and Flash ? Crimp width ? Crimp length Other critical crimp characteristics can be related to several tooling form fea- tures and/or other system factors. These may be less obvious and include: ? Flash ? Roll, twist, and side-to-side bend ? Up/down bend ? Crimp symmetry ? Bellmouth The following discussion focuses on two characteristics, crimp width and flash, as examples of how tooling can affect crimp form. Similar arguments can be applied to the others. Crimp Width Crimp width is a good example of a feature that should be consistent and in control between different crimpers of the same part number. The reason for this is quite straightforward. For a given terminal and wire combination, it is necessary to achieve an area index, AI, which is determined by the terminal designer for op- timal mechanical and electrical performance. Crimp height, CH, and crimp width, CW, directly affect achieving proper AI. Area index, AI(as a percentage), is defined as: where At is the total area of the wire and barrel after crimping. A and A are, respectively, the initial cross- W B sectional areas of the wire and barrel before crimping.A typical design point for AI is 80%. In order to maintain Cross Sections Showing Min- (a) the same AI, the crimp height, CH, needs to change in- imum (a) and Maximum (b) Area Index perTerminal versely to the change of crimp width, CW, in approxi- Specification?aVariation of mately the same proportion. Thus, if the CW increases ? 3.5% +2%, the CH needs to change approximately -2% in order to achieve the same AI design point. At first glance that may not seem significant, but in reality it can be very significant. Using another general industry design rule of (b) the ratio of CH to CW of approximately 65%, a typical set of dimensions used as an example may be: CW = 0.110 in, CH = 0.068 in Therefore, varying the CW by 2% would result in a CH variation of 2%, or 0.0014 in. At a CH tolerance of ? 0.002 in, 35% of the total CH tolerance would be used by a 2% variation in CW. Thus, the importance of crimp width control is obvious when tooling is changed during a production run. Flash Most crimp terminations have a requirement to limit flash. Flash is defined as the material which protrudes to the sides of the terminal down and along the anvil. Flash is normal in the crimping process but excessive flash is very undesirable. Controlling flash requires a balance of several geometric factors. Other factors influencing flash are related to surface finish and friction, which will be discussed later in this paper. A dominant factor in controlling flash is controlling the clearance between the crimper and anvil during the crimp process. Defining the ideal clearance could in itself be a simple matter were it not for two facts: ? In order to minimize terminals? sticking in the crimper, the sides of the crimper are tapered. Thus the clearance between the anvil and crimper varies throughout the stroke. ? Crimper and anvil sets are typically designed to terminate two to four wire sizes. This creates multiple crimp heights. Since the sides of the crimper are tapered to minimize terminal sticking, the maximum clearance permitted without creating flash must be assigned to the maximum crimp height specified for the tooling set. In addition, a minimal clearance must be maintained for the smallest crimp height specified by the tooling set to Crimper-to-Anvil Clearance = X +Y prohibit contact between the anvil and crimper. at the Final Crimp Height Crimper to anvil clearance is thus a combination of crimp width, crimper leg taper, anvil width, and crimp height. The critical design point is at the largest crimp height. This contribution to the gap is directly dependent on dimensional control. The following is offered as an example: Nominal condition: CH = 0.073 in, CW = 0.110 in Crimper leg taper = 3.0 degree Anvil Width = 0.109 in Nominal anvil to crimper total clearance = 0.005 in The clearance can grow rapidly with small changes to (a) Significant flash can be generated the nominal dimensions: with excessive anvil to crimper clearance, as shown by nominal CH remains unchanged = 0.073 in design condition (a) and +0.003 in Increase in crimp width, CW, = 0.0008 in over nominal condition (b) Increase in crimper leg taper = 0.8 degree Decrease in anvil width = 0.0008 in The total increase in total clearance is this case = (b) 0.0026 in This more than a 50% increase in the nominal design clearance, which can result in unacceptable flash (see right). Dimensional control is clearly critical.

Tariff Concession Code
Tariff Desc

8532098
8203.20 TOOLS, crimping, but NOT including crimping tools put up in packs containing electrical connectors Op. 27.05.1985 Dec. 27.05.1985 - TC 8532098

TE Connectivity may also be referenced as

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Deutsch Group
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KILOVAC-TE CONNECTIVITY
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RAYCHEM RPG
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TE Connectivity DEUTSCH
TE Connectivity Hartman
TE Connectivity Holsworthy
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TE Connectivity P&B
TE Connectivity Products Unlimited
TE Connectivity Q-Cees
TE Connectivity Raychem
TE Connectivity Schrack
TE Connectivity Sigma Inductors
TE Connectivity / ABB Entrelec
TE Connectivity / Agastat
TE Connectivity / Agastat Brand
TE Connectivity / Alcoswitch
TE Connectivity / Alcoswitch Brand
TE Connectivity / AMP
TE Connectivity / AMP Brand
TE CONNECTIVITY / AUGAT
TE Connectivity / Axicom
TE Connectivity / Buchanan
TE Connectivity / Buchanan Brand
TE Connectivity / CGS
TE Connectivity / CGS Brand
TE Connectivity / Chip Coolers Brand
TE Connectivity / CII
TE Connectivity / CII Brand
TE Connectivity / Circuit Protection
TE CONNECTIVITY / CITEC
TE Connectivity / Citec Brand
TE Connectivity / CO-EV
TE Connectivity / CoEv Magnetics Brand
TE Connectivity / Corcom
TE Connectivity / Corcom Brand
TE Connectivity / Critchley Brand
TE CONNECTIVITY / CROMPTON
TE Connectivity / DEUTSCH
TE CONNECTIVITY / DEUTSCH AUTOMOTIVE
TE CONNECTIVITY / ELCON
TE Connectivity / Elcon Brand
TE CONNECTIVITY / ENERGY DIVISION
TE Connectivity / Entrelec
TE CONNECTIVITY / GREENPAR
TE Connectivity / Hartman
TE Connectivity / Hartman Brand
TE Connectivity / Holsworthy
TE Connectivity / Holsworthy Brand
TE CONNECTIVITY / HTS
TE Connectivity / Intercontec
TE Connectivity / Kilovac
TE Connectivity / Kilovac Brand
TE Connectivity / Madison
TE CONNECTIVITY / MADISON CABLE
TE CONNECTIVITY / MICRODOT
TE Connectivity / Microdot Brand
TE Connectivity / Midtex Brand
TE Connectivity / Nanonics
TE Connectivity / Nanonics Brand
TE Connectivity / Neohm
TE Connectivity / Neohm Brand
TE Connectivity / OEG
TE Connectivity / OEG Brand
TE Connectivity / P&B
TE Connectivity / P&B Brand
TE Connectivity / Polamco
TE CONNECTIVITY / POTTER & BRUMFIELD
TE CONNECTIVITY / PRODUCTS UNLIMITED
TE Connectivity / Products Unlimited Brand
TE Connectivity / Q-Cees
TE Connectivity / Raychem
TE Connectivity / Raychem Brand
TE Connectivity / Schrack
TE Connectivity / Schrack Brand
TE Connectivity / Sensor
TE Connectivity / Sigma Inductors
TE Connectivity / TE Deutsch ICT
TE Connectivity Aerospace, Defense and Marine
TE Connectivity Alcoswitch Switches
TE Connectivity AMP Connectors
TE Connectivity Corcom Filters
TE Connectivity Deutsch Connectors
TE Connectivity Divested
TE Connectivity Energy
TE Connectivity Measurement Specialties
TE Connectivity Potter & Brumfield Relays
TE Connectivity Raychem Cable Protection
TE Connectivity Raychem Circuit Protection
TE CONNECTIVITY/DEUTSCH
TE SENSOR SOLUTIONS
TEConnectivity
TEConnectivity/AMP
TES
TYC